Squat Pattern Posted on October 30, 2013, 0 Comments

SQUAT

 

You don’t know squat. But you should. One of the seven primal patterns, squatting was essential for survival when we were cavemen and -women. And while evolution has developed our Texting pattern such that many of us have a thenar eminence the size of our bicep, our squatting skills have suffered in kind. Because of this, over 80% of people will endure an episode of back pain in his or her lifetime. And triathletes aren’t immune. So squat! It’s good for your back. It’s good for your knees. And it’s good for your triathlon performance. The only thing it’s not good for is your orthopedic surgeon’s bank account.

 

First Descent—1 dowel-rod support                         

Second Descent—2 dowel-rod supports                   

Third Descent—Swiss Ball on wall as support          

                                   

EXAMPLE EXERCISES

 

Back Squat

  1. Stand with a barbell on shoulders (not the neck) and with chest out, shoulders back, and navel in (this is Good Posture and gospel for every exercise as it emphasizes proper body positioning and activation of the TVA). Hands should be as close in on the bar as flexibility will allow. Feet should be positioned a little wider than hip width apart and either straight ahead or slightly externally rotated.
  2. Inhale to charge the thoracic cavity and then descend into a squat position by leading with the glutes as if sitting in a chair.       Go down as far as possible without pain or losing the lordotic curve in the lumbar spine.
  3. Return to the start position by pushing through the heels and exhaling through pursed lips after passing the sticking point of the ascent. Ensure knees track over feet throughout the movement.

 

Front Squat

  1. Stand with arms crossed, elbows facing forward, barbell on the shoulders and the thumbs of the hands, and with Good Posture. Feet should be positioned a little wider than hip width apart and either straight ahead or slightly externally rotated.
  2. Inhale to charge the thoracic cavity and then descend into a squat position by leading with the glutes as if sitting in a chair. Go down as far as possible without pain or losing the lordotic curve in the lumbar spine.
  3. Return to the start position by pushing through the heels and exhaling through pursed lips after passing the sticking point of the ascent. Ensure knees track over feet throughout the movement.

 

Step Up         

  1. Stand with Good Posture with non-dominant leg placed on a box/bench of appropriate height.
  2. Step onto the box/bench by pushing through the heel (think about pushing the box/bench away). Knee should track over the foot and torso should remain upright throughout the movement. Additionally, hips should not swing out to the side but should remain directly above the foot and knee.
  3. Return to the start position by descending under control, maintaining pressure through the heel so that glutes and hamstrings remain activated.

 

Crossover Step Up

  1. Stand with Good Posture behind and to the side of a box/bench of appropriate height.
  2. Beginning with the non-dominant side, bring the outside leg across the body and onto the outer edge of the box/bench.
  3. Step onto the box/bench by pushing through the heel (think about pushing the box/bench away). Knee should track over the foot and torso should remain upright throughout the movement. Additionally, hips should remain level throughout the movement.      
  4. Cross the non-dominant leg behind the body to descend back to the floor on the opposite side of the bench/box.
  5. Repeat in the opposite direction.

           

Unilateral Squat

  1. Stand with Good Posture on top of a box/bench.
  2. Take the dominant leg off the box/bench and bend the opposite knee to descend the body toward the floor.
  3. Maintain pressure through the heel of non-dominant leg, allowing knee to track over the foot and chest to remain elevated and hips to stay level throughout the movement. .
  4. Go as far as strength will allow with proper form and then push through heel to return to the start position.

 

High Step Up            

  1. Stand with Good Posture with non-dominant leg placed on a box/bench taller than knee height.
  2. Step onto the box/bench by pushing through the heel (think about pushing the box/bench away). Knee should track over the foot and torso should remain upright throughout the movement. Additionally, hips should not swing out to the side but should remain directly above the foot and knee.
  3. Return to the start position by descending under control, maintaining pressure through the heel so that glutes and hamstrings remain activated.